This blog is for the upcoming kindle book 'Alexander's Lost General' by Caitlin Sumner. Currently there is no publishing date available but for now this will be a blog dedicated to Alexander I would like to make clear emphasis that in no way are the posts contained in this blog meant to be historically accurate and above all it is a blog for fun and theories that go with or challenge the history. So come in, welcome, and enjoy. - M

Word Count:

16th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Alexander™ with 162 notes

archaicwonder:

Tetradrachm of Ptolemy I Soter in the name of Alexander III (the Great), Alexandria mint, Egypt c. 310-305 BC
Alexander right wearing elephant skin headdress with the horns of Zeus Ammon and the aegis. On the reverse, AΛEΞANΔPOY, Athena Alkidemos advances carrying a shield, monograms on either side, an eagle on a thunderbolt in the outer right field. The obverse has a  countermark and there is graffiti in the form of an X on the reverse.
Ptolemy I Soter was a Macedonian general under Alexander the Great, who became ruler of Egypt (323–283 BC) and founder of both the Ptolemaic Kingdom and the Ptolemaic Dynasty. In 305/4 BC he demanded the title of pharaoh. The eagle on a thunderbolt was the personal emblem of Ptolemy.
The significance of Alexander in the Elephant Headdress:
Successors of Alexander the Great were rivals, and the history of the decades after Alexander’s death is one of warfare and constantly shifting alliances as they attempted to enlarge and consolidate their holdings. In these struggles coinage and coin portraits in particular played an important role. The first tentative steps in this direction were taken by the Successors who replaced the Herakles/Alexander type with portraits of the deified Alexander as a way of showing reverence for their predecessor and demonstrating their close association with him.
The first to do so was Ptolemy I of Egypt (c. 367-282 BC), a childhood friend of Alexander who immediately laid claim to Alexander’s cult and image in order to legitimize and consolidate his rule and enhance his prestige among the Successors.
In 321 BC Ptolemy hijacked Alexander’s body on its way to burial in Macedonia and had it enshrined in a magnificent tomb in his capital, Alexandria. About the same time he issued tetradrachms with an obverse portrait of Alexander wearing a headdress consisting of an elephant’s scalp, complete with trunk and tusks. The headdress, undoubtedly inspired by Herakles’ lionskin cap on Alexander’s own coins, refers to Alexander’s eastern conquests, in which his troops overcame an Indian army reinforced by some 200 elephants. Beneath the elephant scalp Alexander’s head sprouted ram’s horns, the distinctive attributes of Zeus Ammon, the Egyptian god whose priests had recognized Alexander as his son when he visited Egypt in 331 BC.

archaicwonder:

Tetradrachm of Ptolemy I Soter in the name of Alexander III (the Great), Alexandria mint, Egypt c. 310-305 BC

Alexander right wearing elephant skin headdress with the horns of Zeus Ammon and the aegis. On the reverse, AΛEΞANΔPOY, Athena Alkidemos advances carrying a shield, monograms on either side, an eagle on a thunderbolt in the outer right field. The obverse has a  countermark and there is graffiti in the form of an X on the reverse.

Ptolemy I Soter was a Macedonian general under Alexander the Great, who became ruler of Egypt (323–283 BC) and founder of both the Ptolemaic Kingdom and the Ptolemaic Dynasty. In 305/4 BC he demanded the title of pharaoh. The eagle on a thunderbolt was the personal emblem of Ptolemy.

The significance of Alexander in the Elephant Headdress:

Successors of Alexander the Great were rivals, and the history of the decades after Alexander’s death is one of warfare and constantly shifting alliances as they attempted to enlarge and consolidate their holdings. In these struggles coinage and coin portraits in particular played an important role. The first tentative steps in this direction were taken by the Successors who replaced the Herakles/Alexander type with portraits of the deified Alexander as a way of showing reverence for their predecessor and demonstrating their close association with him.

The first to do so was Ptolemy I of Egypt (c. 367-282 BC), a childhood friend of Alexander who immediately laid claim to Alexander’s cult and image in order to legitimize and consolidate his rule and enhance his prestige among the Successors.

In 321 BC Ptolemy hijacked Alexander’s body on its way to burial in Macedonia and had it enshrined in a magnificent tomb in his capital, Alexandria. About the same time he issued tetradrachms with an obverse portrait of Alexander wearing a headdress consisting of an elephant’s scalp, complete with trunk and tusks. The headdress, undoubtedly inspired by Herakles’ lionskin cap on Alexander’s own coins, refers to Alexander’s eastern conquests, in which his troops overcame an Indian army reinforced by some 200 elephants. Beneath the elephant scalp Alexander’s head sprouted ram’s horns, the distinctive attributes of Zeus Ammon, the Egyptian god whose priests had recognized Alexander as his son when he visited Egypt in 331 BC.

Tagged: alexander the greatptolemy soter i

Source: numisbids.com

13th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from in the arms of my love i'm flying with 102 notes

favourite historical figures, 1/? ›› alexander the great

Tagged: Alexander the Great

12th March 2014

Photo with 1 note

Basic cover created with Kindle’s cover software. As I’m still waiting for the artist to respond. 

Basic cover created with Kindle’s cover software. As I’m still waiting for the artist to respond. 

Tagged: coveralexander's lost generalalexander the greatsooooon

9th March 2014

Post with 1 note

In Other News…

I’ve finished editing part 1, I’m about to hit 80,000 words, I’ve done 44 pages (according to openoffice) and I’m still waiting for my cover art because the guy has vanished and hasn’t answered my emails. Oh and did I mention I’m in HELSINKI!? It’s so amazing!

Tagged: writingAlexander the Greatalexander's lost generalupdatehelsinkiawesomehistorical fiction

4th March 2014

Photo reblogged from Realm of the Chiliarch with 2,513 notes

uomo-rinascimentale:

Ancient Macedonian gold.

uomo-rinascimentale:

Ancient Macedonian gold.

Tagged: macedoniagoldhistoryalexander

Source: uomo-rinascimentale

2nd March 2014

Post with 4 notes

Alexander’s Lost General - Official Description

A female warrior in a time dominated by men, a general in a time ruled by kings. Alexis of Macedon was born with a fire in her spirit that could never be quelled. She grew up at the side of giants, Alexander, Hephaistion, Ptolemy, Cassander. Two would be her brothers, one her lover, and one her greatest enemy. For twenty-two years they stood together, winning wars, conquering the known world, bringing in a new age. For ten more Alexis fought to hold Alexander’s empire, side by side with Ptolemy. She became known as ‘The Warrior Queen’ or ‘Queen of Asia’, ruler of the known world after Alexander.

Love. Death. Betrayal. War. This is the story of Alexis of Macedon.

Tagged: alexander's lost generalalexander the greathephaistionalexandermacedoniahistoryhistorical fictionnoveltruthlovecoming soon

1st March 2014

Photo reblogged from with 13 notes

ic-ar-us:

Bust of Alexander the Great — Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool

ic-ar-us:

Bust of Alexander the Great — Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool

Tagged: Alexander the greatyoung

27th February 2014

Photoset reblogged from She who pwns people with history with 24 notes

tiny-librarian:

I’ve lived… I’ve lived long life, Cadmos, but the glory and the memory of man will always belong to the ones who follow their great visions. The greatest of these is the one they now call Megas Alexandros. The greatest of them all.

In my opinion, the best part of the entire movie, the opening speech by Anthony Hopkins as Ptolemy. I will watch this part over and over and over.

Tagged: alexanderAlexander the Greatptolemyanthony hopkins

23rd February 2014

Photoset reblogged from nous sommes légion with 1,485 notes

shierasea:

Badass Queens 
     O L Y M P I A S; Ὀλυμπιάς

Olympias, (born c. 375 BC—died 316 BC), wife of Philip II of Macedonia and mother of Alexander the Great. She had a passionate and imperious nature, and she played important roles in the power struggles that followed the deaths of both rulers.

“Olympias had long been a devotee to the cult of Dionysos, something that angered many of the Macedonian people and she may even have introduced the practice of handling snakes to the cult…(x)”

The daughter of Neoptolemus, king of Epirus, Olympias apparently was originally named Myrtale. Later she may have been called Olympias as a recognition of Philip’s victory in the Olympic Games of 356 BC. Philip’s polygamy did not threaten her position until 337, when he married a high-born Macedonian, Cleopatra. Olympias withdrew to Epirus, returning after Philip’s assassination (336). She then had Cleopatra and her infant daughter killed. Olympias quarreled repeatedly with Antipater, regent of Macedonia during the early years of Alexander’s invasion of Asia, and eventually retired again, about 331 BC, to Epirus. Upon the death of Antipater in 319 BC (Alexander had died in 323), his successor, Polyperchon, invited Olympias to act as regent for her young grandson, Alexander IV (Alexander the Great’s son). She declined his request until 317 BC, when Antipater’s son Cassander established Philip II’s simpleminded son Philip III (Arrhidaeus) as king of Macedonia. The Macedonian soldiers supported her return. She put to death Philip Arrhidaeus and his wife, as well as Cassander’s brother and a hundred of his partisans. In response Cassander entered Macedonia and blockaded Olympias in Pydna, where she surrendered in the spring of 316. She was condemned to death by the Macedonian assembly, but Cassander’s soldiers refused to carry out the sentence. She eventually was killed by relatives of those she had executed. (x)

Tagged: macedoniahistoryolympiasalexander the great

Source: shierasea

20th February 2014

Photoset reblogged from window in the skies with 391 notes

 Sometimes to expect the best from everyone is arrogance. 

It’s been one of those weeks. Yeah the one where you see Jared Leto twice in two days and both times he greets you like and old friend and you’re reminded of the fact that out of this historically inaccurate movie you mostly hate, he played the one character you love with all your heart to perfection and you wish he would reprise the role in a film version of the new Alexander Epic you’re about to publish, because even though it’s been ten years, he’s still perfect with his blue eyes and his hair that is longer than it was in the movie and he would still play the character to perfection. Then you realize you’ll see him again in two weeks and could just ask him if he wants to do something insane. *laughs loudly because it’s late and I am so behind on editing that I just had to be ridiculous*

Tagged: Alexander the Greatalexander's lost generalhephaistionjared leto

19th February 2014

Photo reblogged from Alexander™ with 25 notes

Tagged: Alexander the Great

Source: madwithfootsteps

14th January 2014

Photo with 26 notes

This dress is what I imagine the wedding gown of Alexis of Macedon would have looked like, had Cassander not poisoned Hephaistion. If Hephaistion had lived, he and Alexis would have been married within the year, with Alexander presiding over their wedding as both their King and lifelong friend. 

This dress is what I imagine the wedding gown of Alexis of Macedon would have looked like, had Cassander not poisoned Hephaistion. If Hephaistion had lived, he and Alexis would have been married within the year, with Alexander presiding over their wedding as both their King and lifelong friend. 

Tagged: alexander the greatalexis of macedonhephaistionalexander's lost general

14th January 2014

Post with 1 note

Character Profile: Alexis

Alexis:

Date of Birth: 354 BC

Date of Death: 270 BC

Age at Death: 84

Height: 5’10”

Hair: Black

Eyes: Blue

Alexis was born two years after Alexander and Hephaistion, but she never let that stop her from becoming a warrior who fought by the side of the king in many battles, and ruled his empire after his death. She had one brother, Solon, who was born blind. He traveled with her throughout Greece and Egypt and rarely left her side, though when he did it was to act as a mediator for Ptolemy during the Wars of the Diodochi. Later in life he traveled with his sister to Gaul and they remained there together for the rest of their lives.

Alexis never developed as close a relationship with Alexander as she did with Hephaistion and Ptolemy, mainly due to the fact that form the age of fifteen, Alexander began to withdraw into himself and by the time of his death, he rarely saw anyone outside of a war room or a council meeting. Instead Alexis found a brother and a friend in Ptolemy and true, but tragic love with Hephaistion. They never married and their love affair was cut short when Cassander poisoned Hephaistion. After his death, Hephaistion’s troops unanimously transferred their allegiance to Alexis and followed her until the day she disbanded her troops and incorporated them into Ptolemy’s Egyptian army. Despite never having an official wedding ceremony, most people considered them to be married from the first time their relationship became known about until his death in 324 BC.

From a young age Alexis and Cassander had a deep and bitter rivalry that wouldn’t end until she fled Egypt and disappeared, though most likely feelings of distrust and dislike persisted until they had both died, despite Cassander not knowing if she was even still alive after she vanished and Alexis so far away that she only had news of dealings in Macedonia every few years. Still, she would never forgive him for killing Hephaistion, Alexander, and Alexander’s young son.

During her lifetime Alexis was appointed as a general in Alexander’s army, given power equal to Hephaistion’s. Only Alexander could contradict an order given by either of them. She was considered by both Alexander and Ptolemy as a sister and she was known to Alexander’s son as ‘Aunt,’ proving that even Roxana knew her important in Alexander’s life. She never had any children of her own, but she doted on Ptolemy’s children and the children of his brother, Menelaus, as well as the young Alexander.

Authors Note:

I want to stress that this profile is in direct relation to the fictional character that I have written and is in no way meant to be entirely historically accurate. This is also a first draft profile and will likely be edited or changed in some way at a later date. 

Tagged: alexis of macedonalexander's lost generalalgalexander the greathephaistionjared letoalexander

13th January 2014

Photoset reblogged from Hellenic Macedonia with 15 notes

hellenic-macedonia:

Alexander the Great (Megas Alexandros) Statue in Thessaloniki/Μacedonia/Greece

I must go here one day.

Tagged: droolalexander the greatmacedoniaomg

13th January 2014

Link reblogged from If I stay silent, I am damned with 7 notes

Did toxic wine kill Alexander the Great? Scientists 'find plant behind ancient leaders agonizing death over 12 days' →

dites-bonjour-au-ciel:

Oh please.  This is just part of one of the theories about Alexander’s death.  It doesn’t solve anything, it’s just someone else theorising again.  Veratrum Album is the most likely source of the poison that could have been used.  This solves nothing! 

For centuries, there has been countless theories about how & why Alexander died.  The same theories have also been applied to the sudden death of Hephaestion, as he died eight months prior to Alexander. 

To theorise further, Cassander is the strongest suspect in the poisoning of Alexander, having arrived in Babylon shortly before the king died & he is believed to have even brought the poison to the city.  Cassander then went on to execute Olympias (Alexander’s mother), and organise the assassination of Roxana & Alexander IV (Alexander the Great’s first wife & son) in his rise to power.  One of Cassander’s brothers, Iollas, can be written in as accomplice to the assassination, being Alexander’s cup-bearer at the time.  Though most historians claim Medius, and not Cassander, induced the cup-bearer into administering the poison to the king.

Sorry, I just take stuff like this to heart because I have a deep interest in Ancient Greek history - Alexander the Great & his companions in particular. 

NOTE:  I am no historian, just a history enthusiast.

This. I entirely agree that Cassander is the most likely to have poisoned not only Alexander, but Hephaistion as well. I am also interested to read this article, but this demanded and instant reblog. 

Tagged: Alexander the greatcassanderpoisonshitshephaistiontruth